Posts in Mahatma Gandhi
Gulliver's Travels

Regarded as the preeminent prose satirist in the English language, Jonathan Swift (1667–1745) intended this masterpiece, as he once wrote Alexander Pope, to "vex the world rather than divert it." Savagely ironic, it portrays man as foolish at best, and at worst, not much more than an ape. Written with disarming simplicity and careful attention to detail, this classic is diverse in its appeal: for children, it remains an enchanting fantasy. For adults, it is a witty parody of political life in Swift's time and a scathing send-up of manners and morals in 18th-century England.

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The Kingdom of God is Within You

Banned in Russia, Tolstoy's The Kingdom of God Is Within You was deemed a threat to church and state. The culmination of a lifetime's thought, it espouses a commitment to Jesus's message of turning the other cheek. In a bold and original manner, Tolstoy shows his readers clearly why they must reject violence of any sort—even that sanctioned by the state or the church—and urges them to look within themselves to find the answers to questions of morality. Its view of Christianity, not as a mystic religion but as a workable philosophy originating from the words of a remarkable teacher, extends its appeal to secular and religious readers alike.

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The Gospel in Brief

In "The Gospel in Brief: The Life of Jesus" the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) offers his retelling of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Through his poetic and moving account of the life of Jesus, we witness the power of Tolstoy's narrative range as well as the spiritual depth of these Biblical Gospels. Perhaps no novelist has been better qualified to offer his imaging of the birth, life, and death of Jesus Christ. "The Gospel in Brief" skillfully envisions the Bible as literature, lending his singular gifts as a novelist to perhaps the most important book in all of Western Civilization.

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Unto This Last

First and foremost an outcry against injustice and inhumanity, Unto this Last is also a closely argued assault on the science of political economy, which dominated the Victorian period. Ruskin was a profoundly conservative man who looked back to the Middle Ages as a Utopia, yet his ideas had a considerable influence on the British socialist movement. And in making his powerful moral and aesthetic case against the dangers of unhindered industrialization he was strangely prophetic.

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The Trial and Death of Socrates

Among the most important and influential philosophical works in Western thought: Euthyphro, exploring the concepts and aims of piety and religion; Apology, a defense of the integrity of Socrates' teachings; Crito, exploring Socrates' refusal to flee his death sentence; and Phaedo, in which Socrates embraces death and discusses the immortality of the soul.

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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is a six-volume work by the English historian Edward Gibbon. It traces Western civilization (as well as the Islamic and Mongolian conquests) from the height of the Roman Empire to the fall of Byzantium. Because of its heavy use of primary sources, unusual at the time, its methodology became a model for later historians. This led to Gibbon's being called the first "modern historian of ancient Rome".

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A Tale of Two Cities

It was the time of the French Revolution — a time of great change and great danger. It was a time when injustice was met by a lust for vengeance, and rarely was a distinction made between the innocent and the guilty. Against this tumultuous historical backdrop, Dickens' great story of unsurpassed adventure and courage unfolds. Unjustly imprisoned for 18 years in the Bastille, Dr. Alexandre Manette is reunited with his daughter, Lucie, and safely transported from France to England. It would seem that they could take up the threads of their lives in peace. As fate would have it though, the pair are summoned to the Old Bailey to testify against a young Frenchman — Charles Darnay — falsely accused of treason. Brilliantly plotted, the novel is rich in drama, romance, and heroics that culminate in a daring prison escape in the shadow of the guillotine.

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Isis Unveiled: Secrets of the Ancient Wisdom Tradition

Although named after the Egyptian goddess Isis - a figure widely associated with magic and nature - this book's scope ranges far beyond ancient Egypt. The author examines the ancient spiritual pantheons of the East, with chapters upon Buddhism and Hinduism. At over 540,000 words, this lengthy and eclectic treatise is considered to be one of the greatest ever produced in the field of esotericism. With this book, Helena Blavatsky introduced what she termed the 'Wisdom-Religion' to the world; a creed in which ancient documents and knowledge are valued as the purest source of spiritual knowledge.

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