Posts in Susan Sontag
The Divine Comedy

A “comedy”, that became a “divine book” for ancestors, is one of the greatest works of art known to the world. It is an encyclopedia of “moral, natural, philosophical and theological” knowledges, a tremendous synthesis of the feudal catholic ideology and the same tremendous epiphany that spread during the new culture times. A great poetic genius of the author put this comedy above the era and made it a legacy of centuries.

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The Immoralist

If you knew the date of your death, how would you live your life? It's 1969 in New York City's Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes. A sweeping novel of remarkable ambition and depth, The Immortalists probes the line between destiny and choice, reality and illusion, this world and the next. It is a deeply moving testament to the power of story, the nature of belief, and the unrelenting pull of familial bonds.

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On the Nature of Things

For anyone concerned to understand the Epicurean philosophical tradition from the inside, the republication, in an updated version, of Martin Ferguson Smith's little-known translation of Lucretius is welcome news. Meticulous, judicious and reader-friendly in equal measure, it embodies the fruits of a lifetime's study of Lucretius' poetic masterpiece. --David Sedley, Christ's College, University of Cambridge

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Anna Karenina

Leo Nikolayevich Tolstoy called his novel "Anna Karenina" not otherwise than "a novel from modern life." He described in great detail the "shattered world" devoid of moral unity, in which the chaos. In the novel there are no stories about great historical events, battle scenes. In it, topics that are close to each person are raised and remain unanswered. In the work of Tolstoy there are no coincidences. Representatives of secular society turn away from Anna Karenina, they do not risk to communicate with ‘a criminal woman’. Her position becomes unbearable. And she makes a fatal step ...

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Faust

The legend of Faust grew up in the sixteenth century, a time of transition between medieval and modern culture in Germany. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) adopted the story of the wandering conjuror who accepts Mephistopheles's offer of a pact, selling his soul for the devil's greater knowledge; over a period of 60 years he produced one of the greatest dramatic and poetic masterpieces of European literature.

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